Online Course: Introduction to International Criminal Law (Michael Scharf)

Taught by one of the world’s leading experts in the field, this course will educate students about the fundamentals of international criminal law and policy. We will explore the challenges of prosecuting international genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and piracy cases.

About the Course

 

From the Nuremberg trial to the case against Saddam Hussein, from the prosecution of Al-Qaeda terrorists to the trial of Somali pirates – no area of law is as important to world peace and security as international criminal law.  Taught by one of the world’s leading experts in the field, this course will educate students about the fundamentals of international criminal law and policy.  We will explore the contours of international crimes such as genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and piracy.  We will examine unique modes of international criminal liability and specialized defenses.  And we will delve into the challenges of obtaining custody of the accused and maintaining control of the courtroom.

Course Syllabus

This course comprises eight units. Each will include an assigned reading, typically an article or book chapter, as well as a simulation designed to bring the readings to life.

I will offer video lectures on each of the topics, accompanied by slides.  In addition, there will be online role-play exercises and debates, enabling the students to share their own insights.

The order of class sessions will be:

(1)     History: From Nuremberg to The Hague

(2)     International Crimes Part 1: War Crimes, Genocide, Crimes against Humanity, and Torture

(3)     International Crimes Part 2: Terrorism and Piracy

(4)     Special modes of liability: command responsibility, co-perpetration, and incitement

(5)      Special defenses: insanity, obedience to orders, duress, and head of state immunity

(6)      Gaining custody of the accused: extradition, luring, abduction, and targeted killing

(7)      Pre-Trial Issues: plea bargaining, self-representation, and exclusion of torture evidence

(8)      Maintaining control of the courtroom

Recommended Background

You don’t have to be a lawyer and there are no prerequisites for this course. However, the course will be conducted at the level expected of advanced undergraduate students. Therefore, for all participants, reading and writing comfortably in English at the undergraduate college level is desirable.

 

Sourcehttps://www.coursera.org/course/intlcriminallaw

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